How To Tackle Vibrations Using A Coriolis Mass Flow Meter

Coriolis mass flow meters are acknowledged or well-known as an extremely precise and accurate flow measuring device. Plus, it offers plenty of benefits than other instruments. But take note that every measuring principle has its obstacles, and it is also true for the Coriolis principle.

For the most part, it can be difficult and hard to use Coriolis devices in most low flow applications in industries manufacturing large and heavy products. In these applications, you might have to face all types of vibrations.

Thus, the question is, how can you deal with these vibrations using the coriolis mass flow meter. For a little help, we will walk you through how to deal with all types of vibrations. So, take a read!

Coriolis Principle

This flow measuring device provides multiple benefits and advantages compared to other measuring instruments. First and foremost, coriolis flow meters calculate or gauge direct mass flow.

For many industries, it is a critical feature because it removes or eradicates inaccuracies induced by the fluid’s physical properties or characteristics. Aside from this, coriolis flow meters are extremely precise and accurate, have no mechanical parts in motion, have immense repeatability, a towering dynamic range, and many more.

The coriolis principle is simple yet very effective. Its operating principle is all around us in this world, such as the rotation of the earth and its impact on the weather. Coriolis flow meters have a tube powered by a fixed vibration. So, when a liquid or gas traverses through this tunnel or duct, the mass flow momentum will, more often than not, create a change or alteration in the vibration of the tube.

Then, the duct will contort culminating a phase shift. This shift can be calculated or computed deriving a linear output corresponding to the flow. As the coriolis principle calculates mass flow regardless of what’s inside the tube, it can be, for the most part, promptly implemented to any fluid traversing through it, gas or liquid.

While the thermal mass flow instruments are reliant on the fluid’s physical properties, thus, similar to the phase shift in frequency between outlet and inlet, it’s possible to calculate the actual natural frequency change.

This frequency change is incongruity to the fluid’s density, and it can derive a further signal output. It’s possible to calculate the volume flow rate having computed both the density and the mass flow rate.

How it Works

Coriolis mass flow meters calculate or gauges the mass via inertia. A dense gas or liquid moves or traverse through a tunnel or duct which is pulsated by a small actuator. This vibration generates a measurable contorting force on the duct corresponding to the mass. More advanced models of this flow measuring technology apply dual-curved tunnels for lower pressure drop and higher sensitivity.

Although considered or known as the most precise flow meters, coriolis mass flow meters are prone to errors or inaccuracies when bubbles are existing in the liquid. These bubbles can produce or generate splashing inside the tube, make noise, and modify or alter the energy required for tube vibration. Huge spaces boost the energy required for tube vibration in excess and can end up in complete failure.

Impact of Vibrations on Accuracy of Coriolis Flow Meters

In manufacturing, factory, commercial, business, trade applications, all types of vibrations with various sizes are eminently common. Coriolis mass flow meters calculate a mass flow through a vibrating sensor duct, which variation gets purposely out of phase when the gas or liquid traverses through.

This technique or approach is relatively susceptible to unnecessary vibrations with a recurrence close to the sensor tube’s resonance frequency or a towering concordant of this frequency. However, it depends on the design of the sensor tube.

The odds of the frequency of these unnecessary vibrations is greater than in an industrial environment. Manufacturers of coriolis mass flow meters do their best to minimize the effect of vibrations on the measurement using some technical solutions including pigtails, active and passive vibration compensation, mass inertia, different sensor shapes, dual-sensor tubes, and higher driving frequencies.

In other words, vibrations can affect the accuracy of the measurements of coriolis mass flow meters. However, only if the frequency of the vibrations is close to the concordant frequency.

Types of Vibrations

In industrial applications, vibrations can be produced by usage-based vibration sources, building-based vibration sources, and environmentally related vibration sources. These vibrations move or traverse through a medium such as the fluid itself, through pipes, in the air, or the floor. If any of these vibrations disrupt the frequency of the device, then the output could be incorrect.

Takeaway

It is helpful to determine the sources to lessen or reduce the effects of unwanted vibrations. Oftentimes, it’s possible to move the measuring device or instrument just a little bit, take advantage of huge mass blocks, use suspension alternatives, or use flexible tubes.

About the Author

Sylvia Hopkins is a writer and a blogger who specializes in email marketing campaigns and ghost blogging. She writes about flow measurement instrumentation, flow measurement application, and technology. When not working, Sylvia spends some quality time with her family and friends.

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