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How To Tackle Vibrations Using A Coriolis Mass Flow Meter

Coriolis mass flow meters are acknowledged or well-known as an extremely precise and accurate flow measuring device. Plus, it offers plenty of benefits than other instruments. But take note that every measuring principle has its obstacles, and it is also true for the Coriolis principle.

For the most part, it can be difficult and hard to use Coriolis devices in most low flow applications in industries manufacturing large and heavy products. In these applications, you might have to face all types of vibrations.

Thus, the question is, how can you deal with these vibrations using the coriolis mass flow meter. For a little help, we will walk you through how to deal with all types of vibrations. So, take a read!

Coriolis Principle

This flow measuring device provides multiple benefits and advantages compared to other measuring instruments. First and foremost, coriolis flow meters calculate or gauge direct mass flow.

For many industries, it is a critical feature because it removes or eradicates inaccuracies induced by the fluid’s physical properties or characteristics. Aside from this, coriolis flow meters are extremely precise and accurate, have no mechanical parts in motion, have immense repeatability, a towering dynamic range, and many more.

The coriolis principle is simple yet very effective. Its operating principle is all around us in this world, such as the rotation of the earth and its impact on the weather. Coriolis flow meters have a tube powered by a fixed vibration. So, when a liquid or gas traverses through this tunnel or duct, the mass flow momentum will, more often than not, create a change or alteration in the vibration of the tube.

Then, the duct will contort culminating a phase shift. This shift can be calculated or computed deriving a linear output corresponding to the flow. As the coriolis principle calculates mass flow regardless of what’s inside the tube, it can be, for the most part, promptly implemented to any fluid traversing through it, gas or liquid.

While the thermal mass flow instruments are reliant on the fluid’s physical properties, thus, similar to the phase shift in frequency between outlet and inlet, it’s possible to calculate the actual natural frequency change.

This frequency change is incongruity to the fluid’s density, and it can derive a further signal output. It’s possible to calculate the volume flow rate having computed both the density and the mass flow rate.

How it Works

Coriolis mass flow meters calculate or gauges the mass via inertia. A dense gas or liquid moves or traverse through a tunnel or duct which is pulsated by a small actuator. This vibration generates a measurable contorting force on the duct corresponding to the mass. More advanced models of this flow measuring technology apply dual-curved tunnels for lower pressure drop and higher sensitivity.

Although considered or known as the most precise flow meters, coriolis mass flow meters are prone to errors or inaccuracies when bubbles are existing in the liquid. These bubbles can produce or generate splashing inside the tube, make noise, and modify or alter the energy required for tube vibration. Huge spaces boost the energy required for tube vibration in excess and can end up in complete failure.

Impact of Vibrations on Accuracy of Coriolis Flow Meters

In manufacturing, factory, commercial, business, trade applications, all types of vibrations with various sizes are eminently common. Coriolis mass flow meters calculate a mass flow through a vibrating sensor duct, which variation gets purposely out of phase when the gas or liquid traverses through.

This technique or approach is relatively susceptible to unnecessary vibrations with a recurrence close to the sensor tube’s resonance frequency or a towering concordant of this frequency. However, it depends on the design of the sensor tube.

The odds of the frequency of these unnecessary vibrations is greater than in an industrial environment. Manufacturers of coriolis mass flow meters do their best to minimize the effect of vibrations on the measurement using some technical solutions including pigtails, active and passive vibration compensation, mass inertia, different sensor shapes, dual-sensor tubes, and higher driving frequencies.

In other words, vibrations can affect the accuracy of the measurements of coriolis mass flow meters. However, only if the frequency of the vibrations is close to the concordant frequency.

Types of Vibrations

In industrial applications, vibrations can be produced by usage-based vibration sources, building-based vibration sources, and environmentally related vibration sources. These vibrations move or traverse through a medium such as the fluid itself, through pipes, in the air, or the floor. If any of these vibrations disrupt the frequency of the device, then the output could be incorrect.

Takeaway

It is helpful to determine the sources to lessen or reduce the effects of unwanted vibrations. Oftentimes, it’s possible to move the measuring device or instrument just a little bit, take advantage of huge mass blocks, use suspension alternatives, or use flexible tubes.

Shedding Light on Non-Destructive Testing with Ultraviolet Lamps

Non-destructive testing (NDT) can be simplistically described as a method used to conduct an inspection without moving or breaking the item or surrounding area under examination. Although not limited to medicine, aerospace, and industry, these three large sectors are particularly dependent on non-destructive inspection methodologies. One of the most helpful tools for NDT is the Ultraviolet (UV) lamp. Let’s take a brief look at the presence of UV lamps in NDT settings.

Non-destructive testing is a broad field

The definition of NDT can be quite broad unless one limits its description to a test, evaluation, or inspection, in a particular field of engineering or medicine. As well, the type of inspection that is required also comes from a long list of possibilities.

Non Destructive Testing

Fluorescent Magnetic Particle Inspection (FMPI or MT) and Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI or PT) are strongly associated with the use of fluorescent lighting and NDT.

Let the light come in

UV light is longer than X-rays, and shorter than visible white light, placing it into the 10 to 400 nm wavelength range. Known as black light, non-visible UV light can be harmful. The shorter UV-C rays, up to 290 nm, however, rarely reach the earth, and this is fortunate. Also be wary of UV-B rays, which are responsible for sunburns. The longer rays of UV-A, between 320 and 400 nm, are the least dangerous to humans.

In the past, magnetic particle penetrants used a mercury base, which became fluorescent with a UV-A light of 365.4 nm. This led to the requirement of today’s UV light sources for NDT. The standard requirement for a peak wavelength is between 360 – 370 mm.

The UV lamp advantage

One aspect of UV lighting that gives it the edge is that it provides visibility into the area under inspection where otherwise, there is none. The magnetic particles or penetrants that are applied to the surfaces of the areas to be inspected become fluorescent, providing visibility into the tiniest of flaws, such as cracks, breaks, and positioning changes.

What to look for in a UV lamp

There are UV lamps and then there are UV lamps. To achieve the most efficient, successful, and safe examinations, it is important to choose the correct UV lamp for the task at hand.

LED illumination

UV LED lamps are highly recommended for non-destructive testing. In fact, for the most part, LED lamps have replaced incandescent and fluorescent lamps, which may not be easily available in the near future.

UV Lamp

However, some legacy UV lamps can be modified to accept LED bulbs. UV LED lamps are lighter, making them very manageable. The bulbs are long-lasting, not prone to fading, and can be housed in cooler casings.

Handheld or stationary

The advantage of handheld UV LED lamps is, of course, their portability and their low energy consumption. However, unlike their predecessors, the mercury vapor bulbs, they do not offer the intensity and the wide beams that are required in some inspections.

Meeting the challenge, some UV lamp producers are using LED lighting to create stationary overhead lamps with intense, wide beam coverage, and adaptable frames, allowing easy vigilance over production in assembly lines. This is a low-cost alternative to frequently-replaced fluorescent bulbs.

The importance of a filter

With a peak wavelength between 360 – 370 nm, violet tail emissions of visible light above 400 nm can mask flaws and cracks with light glare. A filter improves visibility by providing more contrast.

Additional considerations

Science and engineering are always in flux. Similarly, developments in the field of non-destructive testing brings with it much to consider.

  • With the introduction of LED bulbs in UV light sources, dangers resulting from potential accidents in non-invasive fault-seeking, are no longer concerns. Burns resulting from filaments in mercury vapor are becoming a thing of the past. With less electrical demands from LED bulbs, power supplies can be lightweight, making the lamp easier to handle in tough conditions.
  • Just the fact that mercury will no longer be needed is enough of a cause for celebration.
  • Visibility with LED lamps is instantaneous.
  • For some conditions, a narrower beam is required. NDT requirements must lead the way when determining the lamp’s specifications for a particular type of inspection.
  • One challenge that designers are working on is the emission of heat flux at the emitters of UV LED lamps. This is a result of smaller technology with increased energy levels.

Non-destructive testing has broadened its scope over the years, giving rise to compliance standards for specific NDT applications. The most well-known compliance standard to look for in UV-A lamps for NDT with FMPI and FPI, is the ASTM E3022 standard. Whatever the standards of compliance are for a particular industry, non-destructive testing and its reliance on dependable lighting for inspections, is now an important branch of engineering in its own right.

Sustainable Wood Flooring – What You Need to Know Before Fitting New Floors

Updating the flooring in your home is one option if you want to make an impact without breaking the bank. It’s also going to increase its value, especially if you choose wood flooring. Design trends come and go but you’ll never go wrong with a wooden floor. An increasing number of property owners are looking for ways to be more sustainable with their home improvement projects and, when it comes to sustainable flooring, engineered wood fits the bill perfectly. If you need some help with measurements check this free square footage calculator

engineered-wood-flooring

Why Engineered Wood is a More Sustainable Choice

The process of manufacturing engineered wood flooring uses far less of the tree per plank than a solid hardwood floor. This alone makes it a more sustainable, environmentally friendly, and natural wood product. Because the process doesn’t involve and toxic glue, engineered wood flooring is also better for your health. They manufacture bamboo floors and LVTs using toxic glues which are not good because they can contaminate the air you’re breathing.

How can you tell whether the wood flooring you’re looking to buy is really sustainable, and what does sustainability actually mean? Let’s see if we can answer these questions for you.

Is There a Difference Between “Sustainable” and “Green”?

The terms “green” and “sustainable” have become marketing buzzwords but what do they mean? “Green” is a term generally used to describe any type of product that has a positive environmental value. It’s a pretty loose term and can be used to describe a product that a company has manufactured using renewable resources. If the product brand falls short in production and disposal, it doesn’t make a difference to its “green” label.

Sustainable, on the other hand, is a label with far higher standards. It should not impact the environment in any way, throughout its life cycle, from harvesting to disposal.

Buy Your Flooring From a Supplier With an Excellent Reputation

Spend any time researching engineered wood flooring before you make your choice and you’ll encounter a number of different retailers. Most of them are going to be reputable, but you have to be careful if you want to avoid the misleading and unethical ones. If you find a retailer with a sustainable or green logo on their website, check to see what it actually means. It may be that all their products and ethical but equally, there could be just one product that fits the bill.

sustainable-wood-floor

If you can’t find the information, you need to clarify the product you want is sustainable, don’t be afraid to contact the retailer. They are obliged to make things clear.

A Glance at Environmentally Friendly Certifications

Across the globe there are around 600 environmentally friendly labels, 36 of which relate to forest products. Some of these may also indicate a product is sustainable. For the flooring industry, you need to be looking for the following:

  • GREENGOLD Gold – interior materials and products with low chemical emissions.
  • Indoor Air Advantage Gold – products comply with the strictest of indoor air quality emission standards.
  • FloorScore – products meet strict air quality requirements for indoors.
  • FSC (The Forest Stewardship Council) – promotes responsible management of the world’s forests. Together with the Programme for the Endorsement of Forestry Certification they help guarantee wood comes from sustainable sources. This means it is replaced after harvesting and does not harm the environment and neighbouring ecosystems.

Carefully Read Product Instructions

Manufacturers customise their installation and care instructions. Follow those instructions to the letter and your perfect floor will last. This applies even if you’ve hired a professional to install your flooring. Don’t leave them to rely on their previous installation experiences. It doesn’t matter whether the flooring being installed in plank flooring, chevron flooring, herringbone, or Versailles panels.

When it comes to cleaning and taking care of your flooring, make sure you use eco-friendly products and follow the advice of the manufacturer. Don’t be tempted to use home-made cleaners that contain vinegar or other types of acidic ingredients. They will destroy the finish of your floor. Make sure these cleaning products are available for the installer to use as well. Also bear in mind that if you fail to follow the manufacturer’s instruction, the flooring will not be covered by any warranty.

If you want to respect the environment, choosing sustainable wood flooring is the best way to do it. The tips we’ve shared above will help you find the best flooring for your home.

About the Author

This article was written by Martin O’Callaghan of Wood Flooring Ireland who are have been providing the Irish market with Wood Flooring sourced from sustainable European Forests.