Which Option to Consider While Purchasing Forklift: Buy, Lease or Rent?

There are various options to consider when you want to acquire a forklift. As this is no cheap piece of equipment. Making a decision requires you to use a unique lens to decide on what’s best for your scale of operation. Are you torn between renting, leasing or buying? To help you through this challenging process, below, you will find points that will assist you in determining the best cause of action for your business:

 

  1. Renting a forklift

If you in a seasonal peak during your business period or in need of moving extra freight, renting is the choice you can take. When you choose to rent a forklift, you are sure to benefit from experimenting with different classes of forklifts to see which one increases productivity.

 However, rentals are somewhat expensive compared to leasing or buying. This is because you will have to cover maintenance costs as well as the time that the forklift will be idle while at the dealership between rental assignments.

During renting, remember that there will be building waste that needs attention. You need to take care of transportation waste, construction waste sorting as well as recycling streams.

  1. Leasing a forklift

While you are contemplating leasing, you can set your number of years on which you intend to rent the machine. Having a short lease will allow you to work better if you want to become fluid. Leasing will provide you with less monthly payments when compared to renting or buying.

This option allows you to test-drive new models without making a permanent commitment to buying it. You will be at a position to make adjustments where you see fit in terms of decreasing the fleet size, changing product mix or modifying terms of the lease

  1. Buying a forklift

Does your business have a preference for owning all the capital equipment it has? Do you want to access a higher competitive credit line? Is your business stable, or you anticipate to use the material for more than 20 years? Do you have cash at hand to make a purchase immediately? If yes, the best course of action that you should proceed with it buying your forklift machine.

This way, you are sure to make a better return on investment because when you rent over a long period, rental fee tends to become higher as compared to monthly financial costs.

Buying a forklift will allow you to make your modifications than with a rental or leased equipment. You get customized options which suit your specific needs.

You can enjoy a tax deduction as purchased forklift are entitled to a reduced tax.

Conclusion

When deciding on what purchasing technique to use, be sure to analyze your business needs before making any rash decisions. This will go hand in hand with the ultimate choice you make in purchasing option that will work for your company.

Biogas from Slaughterhouse Wastes

Slaughterhouse waste (or abattoir waste) disposal has been a major environmental challenge in all parts of the world. The chemical properties of slaughterhouse wastes are similar to that of municipal sewage, however the former is highly concentrated wastewater with 45% soluble and 55% suspended organic composition. Blood has a very high COD of around 375,000 mg/L and is one of the major dissolved pollutants in slaughterhouse wastewater.

slaughterhouse-waste

In most of the developing countries, there is no organized strategy for disposal of solid as well as liquid wastes generated in abattoirs. The solid slaughterhouse waste is collected and dumped in landfills or open areas while the liquid waste is sent to municipal sewerage system or water bodies, thus endangering public health as well as terrestrial and aquatic life. Wastewater from slaughterhouses is known to cause an increase in the BOD, COD, total solids, pH, temperature and turbidity, and may even cause deoxygenation of water bodies.

Anaerobic Digestion of Slaughterhouse Wastes

There are several methods for beneficial use of slaughterhouse wastes including biogas generation, fertilizer production and utilization as animal feed. Anaerobic digestion is one of the best options for slaughterhouse waste management which will lead to production of energy-rich biogas, reduction in GHGs emissions and effective pollution control in abattoirs.

Anaerobic digestion can achieve a high degree of COD and BOD removal from slaughterhouse effluent at a significantly lower cost than comparable aerobic systems. The biogas potential of slaughterhouse waste is higher than animal manure, and reported to be in the range of 120-160 m3 biogas per ton of wastes. However the C:N ratio of slaughterhouse waste is quite low (4:1) which demands its co-digestion with high C:N substrates like animal manure, food waste, crop residues, poultry litter etc.

Slaughterhouse effluent has high COD, high BOD, and high moisture content which make it well-suited to anaerobic digestion process. Slaughterhouse wastewater also contains high concentrations of suspended organic solids including pieces of fat, grease, hair, feathers, manure, grit, and undigested feed which will contribute the slowly biodegradable of organic matter. Amongst anaerobic treatment processes, the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process is widely used in developing countries for biogas production from abattoir wastes.

Slaughterhouse waste is a protein-rich substrate and may result in sulfide formation during anaerobic degradation. The increased concentration of sulfides in the digester can lead to higher concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the biogas which may inhibit methanogens. In addition to sulfides, ammonia is also formed during the anaerobic digestion process which may increase the pH in the digester (>8.0) which can be growth limiting for some VFA-consuming methanogens.

How to Find the Best Industrial Valve Suppliers in China

The increasing demand for industrial valve suppliers is apparent due to the rapid growth of different industries, such as power plants, oil and gas industry, wastewater treatment, to name a few, in China.

These suppliers are important to various industries in the country as they supply high-quality industrial equipment like gate valves, butterfly valves, ball valves, plug valves, ball valves, etc. Without these needed materials to support different installations of these industries, they will surely have a hard time with the production process.

On a client’s perspective, finding the best valve supplier can be a real challenge, especially if you’re new to the industry.

So, if you are searching for your potential industrial valve supplier in the country, don’t fret. You are definitely on the right page. Below are tips that will help with your selection process. As you read along, you’ll definitely get an idea on how and where to find for the right supplier in China.

Looking for a Good Industrial Valve Supplier in China

Price

Several growing industries focus on one major aspect of the business — the price. This is, without a doubt, essential when choosing suppliers to provide you with the services you need. However, there is more to a valve supplier than just the price. Keep in mind that these people are in business to bring in money, just like you.

Stability

This is one of the major indicators of a good valve supplier. As a client, of course, you want to sign up with manufacturers who have extensive experience in the industry. Suppliers who have been in the business for quite a long time now. Apart from this, the supplier should have long-tenured executive experience as well as a stable and sturdy reputation with the clients. These are surely things you need to consider.

Reliability

Of course, it is highly important for suppliers to be reliable in order to gain trustworthy and loyal customers. This is another important definition of an ideal valve supplier — reliability. Most of the times, you can get the best reliability from large-scale suppliers. These are companies who have enough resources to perform system backups as well as sources in the event something goes wrong.

Location

This is one aspect that you should take note. Valves and other related equipment ordered outside China can take a long time to get to your area and may add up costly freight charges. You can definitely check for potential suppliers without the need to outsource overseas. Find a supplier closer to where you are to avoid unnecessary charges. Orders will be more flexible as well if opt to get suppliers within China.

Competitiveness

Since China is a huge country, valve suppliers are in constant competition. Look for someone who can offer the latest, most innovative products, and services. A company who have well-rounded and knowledgeable employees to answer your questions and market their products effectively. Attractive financial terms should be offered for client purchases. They should have a rational attitude toward you and are willing to work with you hand in hand for potential business growth.

Where to Start Searching?

Now that you already have an idea of what type of supplier you’re looking for, you should also have a better idea of where to start your search. Basically, the best place to start is through the internet, however, there are other areas that might help you as well.

Referrals

Referrals can bring you some of the best leads. The technique is don’t be afraid to ask for recommendations from your local and professional networks. Find individuals who have found success in searching for valve suppliers. Ask them if they are willing to share information and/or their contacts.

Because of social networks, finding potential suppliers is not that much of a hassle. It made it so easy to spread the word, thus increasing your chance of finding a supplier. You can join Facebook groups or other related online communities of industrial business and see if anyone is willing to share his/her review.

As you start to select suppliers, be sure to ask them if they can be of help to point you in the right direction, regardless if they are not the ideal one for you. They will likely have the best contacts and would be glad to refer you to the one that suits your interest best.

Google

Google has always been our go-to when searching for something. With just a simple search, we can immediately find what we’re looking for. However, a lot of potential valve suppliers can’t be seen on the first few searches on Google. Probably because their websites are not up-to-date. Therefore, it is recommended to prioritize the first two pages of the search results. You might also want to use several search terms, such as wholesaler, wholesale, distributor, etc.

Familiarize yourself with Google’s search shortcuts. This is the best way to enhance the search quality, hence the results as well.

Conclusion

Finding the best valve supplier is not that complicated if you know where to begin your search and what to look for. With tons of new valve suppliers in the market today, it can be a challenge who to choose. Hence, it pays to have an idea about a supplier’s background and how long they have been in the industry.

Whether you’re new to the industry or not, these tips will surely help you find your potential supplier. And, speaking of a potential valve supplier in China, XHVAL is definitely top of the list. You might want to check them out.

The 8 Challenges to Networking a Factory

The age of the smart factory is here! More and more industrial processing facilities are hooking everything together, creating internal networks, to reap the benefits that these bring. The data-gathering and analysis-related functions of a networked factory can do wonders for long-term success and production efficiency. However, there are more than a few challenges.

Source: https://unsplash.com/photos/Jth4utoCVNo

Whether you are acquiring supplies from otscable for a new facility or you’re looking to upgrade an existing one, there are issues you have to consider. Some of these might be obvious at the outset, such as the logistics of all this networking gear. Others might catch you off-guard. Here are the seven most critical challenges that occur if you intend to make a smarter factory.

Legacy Equipment

One concern that is highly practical is legacy equipment. Older machinery could come from an era when networking wasn’t important. These could be crucial to your operations, but also too old for a simple “plug and play” approach. This means that you are in desperate need to figure out how to blend the old and new, and that’s not always the easiest thing to achieve.

Unfortunately, there are instances when there is no solution. If you’re upgrading from an existing factory, you will have to settle for mixing the old and new and working as best you can. You can look into using third-party integration equipment and adaptors, which are your best option if a strict update and upgrade are out of the cards.

Physical Logistics

Another huge concern is simple logistics. Where do you lay out the cables? Where are the routers or switches installed? How far between support hardware are the cables running? This is something that you need to understand before you start placing equipment on the ground. Consider the layout and where your heavy machinery as you plan the placement of your networking infrastructure.

Security

Security is a concern. A smart factory collects a great deal of data about your operations, which might be highly sensitive. Protecting it and any insights gained from it is important for most factories and companies. One way to protect the data is to go for a wired network, which traditionally is much harder to infiltrate from the outside.

In general, you do not want to go with a smart factory until you have the security in place. You want layers of protection and authorization for your data. How you achieve that is up to you, though keeping the more sensitive data in a closed network, inaccessible from the outside without the right credentials, is a good first step.

Data Storage

Data storage is also an ongoing concern for smart factories. As operations are recorded down to their minutia, all that information has to be kept somewhere. Preferably, the storage occurs on-site so you don’t have to stretch the network too far and risk security issues. This means you need to account for the storage and the conditions that prevent the hardware from being damaged.

Factory Visibility

Visibility is also a concern. In the old days, you might have observers present but practically no real active monitoring. Most things were probably done passively. In a smart factory, you’re going from zero monitoring to thousands of devices and points collecting data all the time. This can be a staggering amount of information to process and may require a learning curve.

A related challenge to this is if multiple factories are interconnected. Even if you maintained visibility in one, being suddenly thrust into seeing all of your facilities in such detail can be staggering. This is something that usually takes a bit of time to get used to.

Outages

You’ll want back-up systems in place in the event of outages. Never assume that you will never have an outage, and set the network up so that it functions on its own even without internet access. Make sure that the most crucial parts of it can work and record data independently, even under outage conditions.

Edge Networking

Going closer to the “edge” might also be a challenge for you. Edge networks are when a single task is processed by multiple terminals across a network. This can be a serious challenge because it means that your internal network has to connect to a much broader one. This will require serious cooperation between multiple departments, facilities, and personnel.

The Right Tools

Finally, you have to look at the tools you intend to use. The market for devices and tools for smart factories is increasing, which is both good and bad. It’s good because you have more options available, so there are higher odds something that suits your needs is out there. It’s bad because there’s more chaff to wade through, more time needed to get the right ones.

Conclusion

Yes, it is challenging to hook an industrial plant to a network and engage in the “Internet of Things.” There are challenges that must be overcome, logistics to consider, and costs to factor in. However, there are many benefits to gain, both from the network itself and by keeping up to date on the march of technology.

Wastes Generation in Tanneries

Wastes originate from all stages of leather making process, such as fine leather particles, residues from various chemical discharges and reagents from different waste liquors comprising of large pieces of leather cuttings, trimmings and gross shavings, fleshing residues, solid hair debris and remnants of paper bags.

tannery-wastes

Tanning refers to the process by which collagen fibers in a hide react with a chemical agent (tannin, alum or other chemicals). However, the term leather tanning also commonly refers to the entire leather-making process. Hides and skins have the ability to absorb tannic acid and other chemical substances that prevent them from decaying, make them resistant to wetting, and keep them supple and durable. The flesh side of the hide or skin is much thicker and softer. The three types of hides and skins most often used in leather manufacture are from cattle, sheep, and pigs.

Out of 1000 kg of raw hide, nearly 850 kg is generated as solid wastes in leather processing. Only 150 Kg of the raw material is converted in to leather. A typical tannery generate huge amount of waste:

  • Fleshing: 56-60%
  • Chrome shaving, chrome splits and buffing dust: 35-40%
  • Skin trimming: 5-7%
  • Hair: 2-5%

Over 80 per cent of the organic pollution load in BOD terms emanates from the beamhouse (pre-tanning); much of this comes from degraded hide/skin and hair matter. During the tanning process at least 300 kg of chemicals (lime, salt etc.) are added per ton of hides. Excess of non-used salts will appear in the wastewater.

Because of the changing pH, these compounds can precipitate and contribute to the amount of solid waste or suspended solids. Every tanning process step, with the exception of finishing operations, produces wastewater. An average of 35 m3 is produced per ton of raw hide. The wastewater is made up of high concentration of salts, chromium, ammonia, dye and solvent chemicals etc.

A large amount of waste generated by tanneries is discharged in natural water bodies directly or indirectly through two open drains without any treatment. The water in the low lying areas in developing countries, like India and Bangladesh, is polluted in such a degree that it has become unsuitable for public uses. In summer when the rate of decomposition of the waste is higher, serious air pollution is caused in residential areas by producing intolerable obnoxious odours.

Tannery wastewater and solid wastes often find their way into surface water, where toxins are carried downstream and contaminate water used for bathing, cooking, swimming, and irrigation. Chromium waste can also seep into the soil and contaminate groundwater systems that provide drinking water for nearby communities. In addition, contamination in water can build up in aquatic animals, which are a common source of food.

What To Do and What To Avoid When Redecorating Your Home

Do you long to redecorate your home? If you’ve been looking at all the interior trends for 2020 and feel inspired to make some changes to your current décor, you can start making plans to reimagine your home.

However, before you begin it’s worth having an idea of the good and bad elements of decorating so that you know what to look out for. To help point you in the right direction, here’s a roundup of the dos and don’ts to keep in mind.

home-redecoration

Do use textures

Whether you live in a compact apartment or a large house, having a mixture of textures can make a room interesting, especially if you have a neutral colour scheme. So, if you combine grey woolen throws with grey leather cushions, the clashing texture of the two lifts the décor, even though they’re the same colour.

Don’t add small items to a big space

If you’re redecorating a large space, think carefully about the accessories you’re including. Small paintings and other art pieces will be lost on big walls, so it’s worth considering the area you’re trying to fill before hanging anything.

Similarly, rugs need to fill the room. The edges of the rug should sit just underneath your sofa or armchair by a few inches. If you have anything smaller, it can make your room appear to be out of proportion.

Do be clever with colour

If you have a small room, filling it with bold jewel tones might make it seem even smaller, especially if you spend time in there. However, adding a splash of hunter green in the downstairs toilet or a burst of yellow in the hallway can make your entire home feel colourful. This especially the case if the rest of the décor is fairly neutral as the bolder colours stand out more.

Don’t use white if you have children or pets

Mud, paint, and food are more likely to end up on walls and carpets when you have children or pets running around the house. Therefore, white is a colour that doesn’t work well as you spend a lot of time wiping everything down.

Do test colours

Once you have a colour palette in mind, it’s worth buying a selection of tester pots. Add a huge block of the colour you have in mind for the room to the wall so you can see what it looks like in the light and how it fits in the space.

Don’t go over your budget

Home decorating can be expensive, so you’ll need to budget for the updates you make and account for this expense. By shopping around and planning your finances, you’re more likely to stick to what you set out to spend.

What do you have in mind for your home? Will you add a splash of colour or invest in a new rug?

How Robotics Contributes to Sustainable Manufacturing

Environment-friendly manufacturing processes are vital to the success of  businesses. Consumers care about the way that products are made, and how they can be recycled or reused. To meet the needs and concerns of consumers, manufacturers of all types are turning to robotics to grow their sustainable practices.

robotics-sustainable-manufacturing

Reducing Carbon Footprints

Robots are being created and used to reduce manufacturers’ carbon footprints. Factories and ports are known for releasing carbon into the atmosphere. Thus, encouraging climate change. Some ports are turning to use automated robots to reduce their carbon footprint. Instead of gas-powered trucks and tools, robotic vehicles are being used instead. The robots do not rely on fossil fuels for power, so their engines run clean.

Speeding Up Recycling

Robots can take tedious jobs and speed them up. One of the jobs that robots are good at is sorting recycled material. They can do it quickly and efficiently, and they do not require all of the safety gear and training that humans need. Humans can sort about 800 items in an hour, but robots can sort around 2,000 items in the same amount of time.

Cleaning Tanks More Efficiently

Another place that robots are helping the environment is in chemical plants. These plants have massive tanks that need cleaning on a regular basis. The tanks have small openings, and they are filled with toxic chemicals and volatile gases.

robotics-chemical-industry

In the past, humans have had to enter these confined spaces to clean the tanks. They had to be trained in several safety procedures, wear a plethora of safety gear, and undergo decontamination procedures each time they left the tanks. Now, robotic tank cleaning can do it in a fraction of the time, using less water and cleaning materials. They take away the danger from human employees, and robots can work 24 hours per day.

Improving Sustainable Manufacturing

Robots are being used in different types of manufacturing to create more efficiency with fewer resources. Robots reduce errors, so less waste is produced. One computer company is relying on robots to pick reusable parts out of recycled products. This type of manufacturing sustainability includes recycling, reusing, and reducing. Less waste is produced and the robots are able to find and separate the small parts more efficiently than human hands can.

Cleaning Natural Resources

Robots are also being used outside of manufacturing to help with green living. Several organizations rely on robots to clean waterways. These robots float atop the water and collect the trash as it floats. Another water-cleaning robot is able to digest pollution. The robot turns the trash into fuel that powers the boat and that controls it. Inventors are working on upscaling the robot so it can power large tankers and cargo freighters, too.

Robots are also used to clean plants that become dirty from the garbage and grime in the water. By cleaning water and flora in it, robots are protecting the lives of animals that make their homes in wetlands and coastal areas. They also help clean food supplies for people.

Thermal Conversion of Tannery Wastes

Tanneries generate considerable quantities of sludge, shavings, trimmings, hair, buffing dusts and other general wastes and can consist of up to 70% of hide weight processed. Thermal conversion technologies by virtue of chemically reducing conditions, provides a viable alternative thermal treatment for tannery wastes, especially for chrome containing materials, and generates a chrome (III) containing ash. This ash has significant commercial value as it can be reconstituted.

tannery-wastes

All of the wastes generated by the tannery can be gasified following pre-treatment methods such as maceration, drying and subsequent densification or briquetting. A combined drying and gasification process could eliminate solid waste, whilst providing a combustible gas as a tax-exempt renewable energy source, which the tannery can directly reuse. Gasification trials have illustrated that up to 70% of the intrinsic energy value of the wastes currently disposed can be recovered as “synthesis gas” energy.

Gasification technology has the potential to provide significant cost benefits in terms of power generation and waste disposal, and increase sustainability within the leather industry. The gasification process converts any carbon-containing material into a combustible gas comprised primarily of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane, which can be used as a fuel to generate electricity and heat.

A wide range of tannery wastes can be macerated, flash dried, densified and gasified to generate a clean syngas for reuse in boilers or other Combined Heat and Power systems. As a result up to 70% of the intrinsic energy value of the waste can be recovered as syngas, with up to 60% of this being surplus to process drying requirements so can be recovered for on-site boiler or thermal energy recovery uses.

A proprietary technology has been in commercial operation at a tanyard on the West Coast of Norway since mid 2001. The process employs gasification-and-plasma-cracking and offer the capability of turning the tannery waste problem to a valorising source that may add values to the plant owner in terms of excessive energy and ferrochrome, a harmless alloy that is widely used by the metallurgical industry. The process leaves no ashes but a non-leaching slag that is useful for civil engineering works, and, hence, no residues for landfill disposal

Overview of Biomass Handling Equipment

The physical handling of biomass fuels during collection or at a processing plant can be challenging task, particularly for solid biomass. Biomass fuels tend to vary with density, moisture content and particle size and can also be corrosive. Therefore biomass fuel handling equipment is often a difficult part of a plant to adequately design, maintain and operate.

Biomass_Conveyor

The design and equipment choice for the fuel handling system, including preparation and refinement systems is carried out in accordance with the plant configuration. This is of special importance when the biomass is not homogeneous and contains impurities, typically for forest and agricultural wastes. Some of the common problems encountered have been the unpopular design and undersized fuel handling, preparation and feeding systems.

The fuel handling core systems and equipment are dependent on both the raw fuel type and condition as well as on the conversion/combustion technology employed. The core equipment in a biomass power plant include the following:

  1. Fuel reception
  2. Fuel weighing systems
  3. Receiving bunkers
  4. Bunker discharge systems (stoker, screw, grab bucket)
  5. Fuel preparation
  6. Fuel drying systems
  7. Crushers
  8. Chippers
  9. Screening systems
  10. Shredding systems
  11. Grinding systems (for pulverised fuel burners)
  12. Safety systems (explosion relieve, emergency discharge, fire detections etc)
  13. Fuel transport and feeding
  14. Push floors
  15. Belt feeders
  16. Conveyers and Elevators
  17. Tube feeders
  18. Fuel hoppers and silos (refined fuel)
  19. Hopper, bunker and silo discharge
  20. Feeding stokers
  21. Feeding screws
  22. Rotary valves

To enable any available biomass resource to be matched with the end use energy carrier required (heat, electricity or transport fuels) the correct selection of conversion technologies is required. Since the forms in which biomass can be used for energy are diverse, optimal resources, technologies and entire systems will be shaped by local conditions, both physical and socio-economic in nature.

As the majority of people in developing countries will continue using biomass as their primary energy source well into the next century, it is of critical importance that biomass-based energy truly can be modernized to yield multiple socioeconomic and environmental benefits.

Sustainable Manufacturing: Eco-Friendly Ideas For Your Plant

The industrial sector, which includes the manufacturing industry, is the third largest global source of greenhouse gas emissions. Shockingly, the sector emits roughly 21% of all greenhouse gasses, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reveals. Fortunately, there are a number of ways manufacturing companies can lower their carbon footprints, adopt eco-friendly equipment and practices, and become more sustainable.

ecofriendly-manufacturing

Audit energy use

Manufacturing plants typically use huge amounts of gas or electric energy. Adopting energy-efficient practices to optimize the plant’s energy use can slash costs considerably. Start by conducting an energy audit — ideally during the next scheduled plant downtime — to identify areas requiring improvement. HVAC systems, in particular, are huge energy and money drainers. Replace the filters and insulation so hot or cold air doesn’t escape. Repairs may also be needed. Temperature controls can be precisely automated with a programmable digital thermostat.

Additionally, common industrial lighting like incandescent bulbs should be switched out for LED lighting, which uses 75% less energy and lasts 25 times longer. Keep track of your eco-friendly changes and monitor energy use to make sure you’re operating at maximum efficiency.

Minimize waste

Reducing manufacturing waste is an effective way of making your plant more sustainable. For example, limit the quantity of excess raw materials your plant has in stock; order just enough material for the job it’s needed for each time. Work on recovering waste from both onsite and offsite locations with the help of techniques like centrifugation, electrolysis, reverse osmosis, or filtration.

industrial-valve

Alternatively, recycling materials is a simple way to recover useful materials (recycling hazardous materials, however, usually isn’t eco-friendly). High-power, industrial shredders, in particular, can help you deal with a number of waste materials (such as, wood, plastic, rubber, and asphalt) by considerably reducing their size. Investing in durable equipment also reduces waste. For example, Bobcat T190 tracks are designed to minimize wear and tear to the tire. The thick, high-quality rubber lasts longer, so the tires need replacing less often.

Switch to renewable energy

Switching to renewable energy can help your plant generate its own clean electricity and heating. In fact, by 2035, renewable energy is set to be the main global power source, according to the 2019 Clean Jobs America report. Green power sources like solar, wind, biomass, geothermal heat, and rain are also cheaper than traditional fossil fuel energy sources.

Depending on your state, you may also be able to benefit from tax incentives and earn money back. You can also support renewable energy by selecting a renewable electricity tariff with your supplier. This means either some or all of the power your plant uses will be matched by your supplier purchasing green energy.

Making your manufacturing plant more eco-friendly certainly isn’t an overnight job. However, it’s well worth the time and effort it takes to make positive and permanent changes. Switching to sustainable practices and equipment will help the environment, save energy, and improve your bottom line.