14 Writing Contests for High School Students in 2021

With the beginning of the new academic year, students have a great opportunity to demonstrate their talent in writing! Both novice authors and those who already have a ready-made but still unreleased masterpiece gathering dust on the table can participate in various competitions. You are probably a creative artist or an aspiring writer. There is a wide range of writing projects for teens and undergraduate students — you may need the links.

We are happy to present you with an updated list of challenges for authors and poets! Indeed, this is a great motivation to finish a long-started work or start a creative path with a clean slate. The top compositions will receive wonderful prizes! You may need professional advice on your essay. In this case, visit the pro essay writer service, and get expert help on your piece of writing.

We have made a list of the top 14 creative contests for outstanding students. There are several types of genres, including plays, fiction, and poetry. Our list of publishing platforms provides young authors and artists with chances for recognition in various areas.

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1. Rattle Young Poets Anthology

This project seeks young authors who are up to 15 years old when they wrote the poem and 18 or less when submitted. The students’ parents, teachers, and guardians can also submit poems. Checking out some helpful tips in writing can help you create the best poem ever.

Submissions: 50 poems are chosen from all applications.

Ages: 18 or less

Closing date: late June

2. Ocean Awareness Student Contest

The proposed theme challenges young essayists to explore, understand, research, and write their views on the relations between people’s actions and the oceans’ state. Rewards vary from $100 to $1,500.

Eligibility: High and Middle school students may participate.

Deadline: June 2021.

3. Princeton University Poetry Contest for High School Students

This challenge recognizes exceptional writings by young authors at high school.

Awards: The winning prize is $500, and then $250 is given for the 2nd best, and $100 for the third top poem.

Grades: 11.

Closing period: Fall.

4. Hypernova Lit

In this contest, any kind of work is accepted. You may send poetry, prose, long or tiny stories, essays about your life as well as experiences, journal writing, plays, scripts, or letters.

Grades: All ages with grades are eligible.

Deadline: submission is year-round.

5. Canvas Literary Journal

The prominent literary journal for teens arranges this challenge. It seeks novice authors to send novel excerpts, cross-genre, plays, nonfiction, or fiction, poems, and innovative media.

Ages: 13-to18.

Closing period: papers are accepted in the fall.

6. The Bennington Young Writers Awards

The teenagers of grades 9th to 12th worldwide are requested to write original compositions in three types: fiction (a brief narrative story), poetry (three best poems), or nonfiction (an individual essay). The leaders in each classification receive a reward of $500, and the other top writers are awarded $250.

Grades: from 10 to 12.

Deadline: All works are accepted in the fall.

7. Princeton University 10 Minute Play Contest

Eminent professors and lecturers of the Academic Program assess the works. Permissibility for this yearly writing competition is limited to learners in grade 11. The sums given to the top three works are as follows: $100, $250, and $500.

Grades: only 11.

Closing period:  Fall.

8. The New Voices One-Act Competition for Young Playwrights

By sending your selected one-act play to the creative contest, you can possibly win some money or technical innovations from wonderful promoters and even get approval for future publication!

Ages of applicants: up to 19.

Period for submission: Fall.

9. Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

This popular contest has the widest selection of prospects for resourceful self-expression. Twenty-nine categories range impressively. Via the contest, high schoolers receive great publication opportunities, demonstration prospects, grants, as well as recognition.

Grades: 7 to 12, and 13 years or over, residing in the USA, or Canada.

Deadlines vary by category, starting from September to late December.

10. One Teen Story

This is an esteemed book publication for story creators and admirers of teen literature. Subscribers have an opportunity to get one revised and corrected brief story once a month via mail. Professionals in composition, professors, in addition to seasoned lecturers, revise the papers, but you may also contact a free essay editing service to help you out.

Ages: 13 to 19.

Submission period: begins in September and ends in May.

11. Nancy Thorp Poetry Contest

The challenge is for novice women writers, currently juniors, in any high school. It affords prizes, grants, and countrywide recognition for their best poems. Rewards are usually up to $5,000. The participants of the inventive writing project select the best authors. Qualified specialists and experienced lecturers grade the papers.

Grades: 11 to 12.

Period for submission: October every year.

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12. The Claremont Review

The main publishing managers of the venture provide a great opportunity for emerging writers to choose from various styles: modern writing or traditional. Undergraduate students can publish their narrative stories, plays, poems, and even photography.

Eligible ages: 12 to 19.

Submission: September 2020 to April 2021.

13. YoungArts

The program is an application-based contest for novel writers or artists. Young people may apply in a broad range of disciplines, comprising essay writing, visual arts, design, and music. The project organizers ask the participants to prepare a decent portfolio.

Ages: 15-to 18 or from grades 10-12.

The closing period for submission: October.

14. Achievement Award in Writing

This famous award is nominated for new creative writers in the US, Canada, and abroad (accredited American schools). Authors must submit a sample of their best composition and one specific essay to their school’s language department. Apparently, this project is helpful for students to learn to write as well as improve writing exam results easily.

Eligible ages: 13 to 18.

Deadline:  Essay submissions for 2021 are open starting from November 15 to February 15.

Conclusion

Submitting your composition for review and publication can lead your creative energy into a significant and rewarding venture. Participating in a competition, or having your essay published, is also vital in college admissions decisions for a graduate. You will study how to write better, pass your exams, and be more successful in your course. Excellence in writing and high marks will help you get several higher education opportunities and get a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in top universities.

Obviously, you need to be creative and sincere in your works. Write and try your luck in the famous contests mentioned. Who knows, you may become the best writer in your region or even state! So be brave and do not hesitate to take part!

11 Ways College Students Can Save Paper

Paper, in all of its forms, is one of the most useful and versatile products. It is also one of the most widely used item for college students. The bad news is that our use of paper has some pretty intense impacts on the environment. These include water and air pollution, deforestation, and the accumulation of paper waste in landfills.

The good news is that every individual can play a role in helping to eliminate the damage done by the use of and production of paper products. Now, this is the point where many readers will think of themselves, “I recycle. Isn’t that enough?”

The truth is, while recycling certainly helps, it doesn’t eliminate the problems our use of paper creates. In fact, the recycling process itself has an environmental cost.  Keep recycling for sure, but also consider ways in which you can reduce the amount of paper you use. Here are eleven ways you can get started.

1. Make your subscriptions digital

Whether your interests are in technology, fashion, current events, music or something else, magazines are full of useful information. The problem is that once you’re done with them, your choices are to recycle them, throw them out, or let them collect dust. None of these things are good for the environment.

Instead, convert your paper subscriptions to digital. Not only will you help the environment, you’ll save space as well. Even better, digital copies of magazines are searchable. This means you can find the articles you want with ease.

2. Donate old newspapers and magazines

If you do have hard copies of newspapers and magazines at home, don’t throw them out or recycle them. There may be places that are happy to take them off your hands. Your local community center, retirement homes, hospitals and homeless shelters are often in search of reading materials for their clients.

3. Use double-sided printing

There is no way to avoid printing altogether, but you may be able to reduce the paper you use when you do print. Whenever possible use double-sided printing. You can even print more than one page per side. Also, experiment line spacing and font size. With a few adjustments, you can significantly reduce the amount of paper you print over time. Encourage your friends, even your University and College, and your community to do the same.

4. Get your statements online

If you are still receiving your bank statements and billing notices via snail mail that’s a problem. Not only are you getting your paper bills and statements, chances are you’re receiving inserts, coupons, and other junk. Convert to paperless mode and eliminate all of this.

5. Use a blackboard or whiteboard

Shopping lists, reminders, and notes to your roommates represent just a few of the things you likely jot down and have scattered about your place. You aren’t alone. Those bits and pieces of paper add up. You can replace these by simply hanging up a whiteboard or blackboard in a convenient spot.

If somebody needs to jot something down, they can use that instead of wasting paper. If you need something a bit more portable, simply snap a picture with your phone.

6. Get a digital calendar

You also don’t need paper to stay on top of your schedule or to coordinate with friends and family members. Instead, choose a digital calendar that works for you. Then arrange to share calendars with those friends and family members. With most online calendars you can create to-do lists, set alarms, and send out reminders.

7. Give old newspapers to animal shelter

Your local animal shelter or rescue might be thrilled to get your old newspapers. They use these for bedding and as cage liners.  Newspapers can also be used to help insulate winter shelters for feral cat colonies.

8. Use washcloths and hand towels

There is no doubt that paper towels and napkins are useful. Many of us use them while we’re eating, to wipe up spills, for cleaning, even for covering food in the microwave. The problem is that once we’re done all of those paper products go directly into the trash. That’s wasteful and bad for the environment. Instead, invest in cloth alternatives.

Washcloths and hand towels are exceptionally cheap. Cloth diapers last forever and are amazing for cleaning. Even old worn-out clothing can be cut up and used as dust rags.

9. Take notes digitally

At this point, there should be little or no occasions where you need to take notes on paper. There are simply too many options for taking notes digitally, not to take advantage of this. Save paper by using an app, such as Evernote, to take and organize your notes.

Use voice to text, or simply type up your notes in your favorite word processor. Not only will your digital notes save paper, you’ll be better able to create quality essays and research papers. If you need help to turn these notes into better papers, check out essay editing reviews. Save the planet, and improve your grades.

In some cases, you don’t need to take notes at all. See if your instructors save handouts and lecture notes online. Then, simply use these as reference materials.

10. Reduce paper use at the grocery store

Hopefully, you have ditched single-use plastic and paper bags for reusable ones. If not, this is a great place to start. However, that’s just the beginning. There are other ways to reduce paper use while you shop.

First, hit the bulk bins for your dried goods. Instead of using the plastic or paper bags provided, bring your own reusable containers. Next, pay attention to packaging as you shop. You’ll be amazed at the amount of paper and plastic that is wasted through extra packaging. Be a conscientious shopper, and buy products that use the least amount of paper material.

11. Praise brands that use less paper

While you shop, pay attention to which brands are responsible in their use of paper and which brands are not. Then, let your thoughts be known. If a brand is behaving responsibly in this area, contact them and let you know you appreciate it and will be buying their products.

If not, contact them with your concerns. Believe it or not, companies do care what you think, and if they hear from enough people they might change their behaviors.

Final thoughts 

Paper waste is a huge problem at colleges and universities. In fact, the issue can seem overwhelming. However, if every individual would change a few of their habits with regard to paper consumption, there would be a great impact. You can get started with these steps.