A New Form of Ecotourism in Cyprus

Ecotourism has gained popularity as different states seek sustainability. It was one of the millennial goals at the global level, and many states have invested money and ideas into the project. Cyprus has not been left behind and has done a lot to promote a new form of ecotourism in the country. If you are planning to obtain a Cyprus immigration with One Visa, their agents definitely mention a few things about ecotourism in Cyprus. Now that you are reading this publication, you have come to the right place to get insights on a new form of ecotourism.

Guided Walks

Cyprus has a plethora of trained guides to lead you on nature walks. You can easily choose the destination from a list of many depending on what you want to view and experience. Some are best suited for the family while others are suited for explorers. For walks and expeditions in the forest and on the beaches, the guides will explain all the regulations that seek to protect the habitat by leaving it as natural as possible. Unfortunately, Cyprus’s government does not allow collection of souvenirs and artifacts.

Cyprus Village Tours

Cyprus still has people living in villages in rural areas. However, the villages are becoming smaller by the day, and the government is encouraging their growth. This is one way to preserve the original culture of the Cypriot people. The number of people who can take bus tours to the villages is highly regulated. If you would like to visit these villages, make sure that you book well in advance and follow the given regulations.

Marine Tours

Cyprus is an island and has breathtaking and clean beaches. The marine department is obsessed with maintaining the original form of both the beaches and the marine life. However, this does not mean that people cannot go to visit the marine life. The country offers guided tours to the beach, shallow sea and deep sea. Some of the best scenery can be found at the untouched shipwrecks and with the marine life that dwells in and around the shipwrecks. The diving tours are guided and regulated by the government to make sure that the untouched environment is maintained.

A breath-taking natural attraction in Cyprus

Preserving the Historic Sites

Any tour in Cyprus cannot be complete without touring the historic and cultural ruins. However, have you ever wondered how these sites still exist or why they get recognized all over the world? It has taken great efforts to protect them and let nature take its course. Even though Cyprus has modern architectural buildings, none has interfered with these cultural and historic sites. They spread all over the island and carry a rich history for all people to enjoy.

Conclusion

Finally, it is worth mentioning that Cyprus has zoos and modern parks that protect indigenous plants and animals. The public is allowed to visit under certain regulations. The government strives to preserve the country’s tourist attractions through the employment of ecotourism strategies. If you visit the country as a tourist or an expat, remember to check the regulations that govern ecotourism.

Biomass Energy and Sustainability

biomass-sustainabilityBiomass energy systems offer significant possibilities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions due to their immense potential to replace fossil fuels in energy production. Biomass reduces emissions and enhances carbon sequestration since short-rotation crops or forests established on abandoned agricultural land accumulate carbon in the soil. Biomass energy usually provides an irreversible mitigation effect by reducing carbon dioxide at source, but it may emit more carbon per unit of energy than fossil fuels unless biomass fuels are produced in a sustainable manner.

Biomass resources can play a major role in reducing the reliance on fossil fuels by making use of thermo-chemical conversion technologies. In addition, the increased utilization of biomass-based fuels will be instrumental in safeguarding the environment, generation of new job opportunities, sustainable development and health improvements in rural areas.

The development of efficient biomass handling technology, improvement of agro-forestry systems and establishment of small and large-scale biomass-based power plants can play a major role in sustainable development of rural as well as urban areas. Biomass energy could also aid in modernizing the agricultural economy and creating significant job opportunities.

Harvesting practices remove only a small portion of branches and tops leaving sufficient biomass to conserve organic matter and nutrients. Moreover, the ash obtained after combustion of biomass compensates for nutrient losses by fertilizing the soil periodically in natural forests as well as fields.

The impact of forest biomass utilization on the ecology and biodiversity has been found to be insignificant. Infact, forest residues are environmentally beneficial because of their potential to replace fossil fuels as an energy source.

A quick glance at popular biomass resources

A quick glance at popular biomass resources

Plantation of energy crops on abandoned agricultural land will lead to an increase in species diversity. The creation of structurally and species diverse forests helps in reducing the impacts of insects, diseases and weeds. Similarly the artificial creation of diversity is essential when genetically modified or genetically identical species are being planted.

Short-rotation crops give higher yields than forests so smaller tracts are needed to produce biomass which results in the reduction of area under intensive forest management. An intelligent approach in forest management will go a long way in the realization of sustainability goals.

Improvements in agricultural practices promises to increased biomass yields, reductions in cultivation costs, and improved environmental quality. Extensive research in the fields of plant genetics, analytical techniques, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) will immensely help in increasing the energy potential of biomass feedstock.

A large amount of energy is expended in the cultivation and processing of crops like sugarcane, coconut, and rice which can met by utilizing energy-rich residues for electricity production. The integration of biomass-fueled gasifiers in coal-fired power stations would be advantageous in terms of improved flexibility in response to fluctuations in biomass availability and lower investment costs. The growth of the biomass energy industry can also be achieved by laying more stress on green power marketing.

Resource Base for Second-Generation Biofuels

second-generation-biofuelsSecond-generation biofuels, also known as advanced biofuels, primarily includes cellulosic ethanol. The feedstock resource base for the production of second-generation biofuel are non-edible lignocellulosic biomass resources (such as leaves, stem and husk) which do not compete with food resources. The resource base for second-generation biofuels production is broadly divided into three categories – agricultural residues, forestry wastes and energy crops.

Agricultural Residues

Agricultural (or crop) residues encompasses all agricultural wastes such as straw, stem, stalk, leaves, husk, shell, peel, pulp, stubble, etc. which come from cereals (rice, wheat, maize or corn, sorghum, barley, millet), cotton, groundnut, jute, legumes (tomato, bean, soy) coffee, cacao, tea, fruits (banana, mango, coco, cashew) and palm oil.

Rice produces both straw and rice husks at the processing plant which can be conveniently and easily converted into energy. Significant quantities of biomass remain in the fields in the form of cob when maize is harvested which can be converted into energy.

Sugarcane harvesting leads to harvest residues in the fields while processing produces fibrous bagasse, both of which are good sources of energy. Harvesting and processing of coconuts produces quantities of shell and fibre that can be utilised while peanuts leave shells. All these lignocellulosic materials can be converted into biofuels by a wide range of technologies.

Forestry Biomass

Forest harvesting is a major source of biomass energy. Harvesting in forests may occur as thinning in young stands, or cutting in older stands for timber or pulp that also yields tops and branches usable for production of cellulosic ethanol.

Biomass harvesting operations usually remove only 25 to 50 percent of the volume, leaving the residues available as biomass for energy. Stands damaged by insects, disease or fire are additional sources of biomass. Forest residues normally have low density and fuel values that keep transport costs high, and so it is economical to reduce the biomass density in the forest itself.

Energy Crops

Energy crops are non-food crops which provide an additional potential source of feedstock for the production of second-generation biofuels. Corn and soybeans are considered as the first-generation energy crops as these crops can be also used as the food crops. Second-generation energy crops are grouped into grassy (herbaceous or forage) and woody (tree) energy crops.

Grassy energy crops or perennial forage crops mainly include switchgrass and miscanthus. Switchgrass is the most commonly used feedstock because it requires relatively low water and nutrients, and has positive environmental impact and adaptability to low-quality land. Miscanthus is a grass mainly found in Asia and is a popular feedstock for second-generation biofuel production in Europe.

Woody energy crops mainly consists of fast-growing tree species like poplar, willow, and eucalyptus. The most important attributes of these class species are the low level of input required when compared with annual crops. In short, dedicated energy crops as feedstock are less demanding in terms of input, helpful in reducing soil erosion and useful in improving soil properties.